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Updated: 2 hours 58 min ago

Coast Guard Sector Columbia River to hold memorial service for fallen Coast Guard member

Wed, 01/25/2017 - 07:31

WARRENTON, Ore. — The Coast Guard is scheduled to hold a memorial service to celebrate the life of Lt. Devin Hepner at the Sector Columbia River hangar at 11:00 am, Tuesday, that will be open to the public.

Anyone interested in attending the memorial service please RSVP no later than 4:00 pm Friday, by following this link:

https://einvitations.afit.edu/inv/anim.cfm?i=327656&k=0163450F7E51

Military personnel attending the funeral are required to wear Service Dress Blues with Combination Cover or service equivalent uniform and business casual for civilian invitees.

For further information contact Lt. Cmdr. Chris Morris at 503-791-3631.

Coast Guard Sector Columbia River to hold memorial service for fallen Coast Guard member

Wed, 01/25/2017 - 07:31

WARRENTON, Ore. — The Coast Guard is scheduled to hold a memorial service to celebrate the life of Lt. Devin Hepner at the Sector Columbia River hangar at 11:00 am, Tuesday, that will be open to the public.

Anyone interested in attending the memorial service please RSVP no later than 4:00 pm Friday, by following this link:

https://einvitations.afit.edu/inv/anim.cfm?i=327656&k=0163450F7E51

Military personnel attending the funeral are required to wear Service Dress Blues with Combination Cover or service equivalent uniform and business casual for civilian invitees.

For further information contact Lt. Cmdr. Chris Morris at 503-791-3631.

Coast Guard, local fire departments searching for missing kayaker near Dumbarton Bridge

Tue, 01/24/2017 - 21:00

SAN FRANCISCO — Coast Guard and local fire department crews are searching for a kayaker who went missing near the Dumbarton Bridge Tuesday afternoon.

The missing kayaker has been identified as Kenneth Maldanado of San Jose. Maldanado is described as a 32-year-old Hispanic male, bald, with a goatee.

Maldanado’s friend was on a raft nearby when he went missing and subsequently called the Coast Guard at approximately 4:30 p.m., reporting that Maldanado had capsized his kayak near the Dumbarton Bridge and did not resurface.

The Coast Guard launched a helicopter crew, a small-boat crew, and Coast Guard Cutter Tern to search the area. Several local fire department crews are also assisting in the search efforts from Alameda County, Menlo Park, San Jose County and Santa Clara.

If anyone has seen Maldanado or has any additional information that may assist in the search efforts, please contact Coast Guard Sector San Francisco personnel at (415) 740-4364 or via radio at VHF-FM channel 16.

Coast Guard, local fire departments searching for missing kayaker near Dumbarton Bridge

Tue, 01/24/2017 - 21:00

SAN FRANCISCO — Coast Guard and local fire department crews are searching for a kayaker who went missing near the Dumbarton Bridge Tuesday afternoon.

The missing kayaker has been identified as Kenneth Maldanado of San Jose. Maldanado is described as a 32-year-old Hispanic male, bald, with a goatee.

Maldanado’s friend was on a raft nearby when he went missing and subsequently called the Coast Guard at approximately 4:30 p.m., reporting that Maldanado had capsized his kayak near the Dumbarton Bridge and did not resurface.

The Coast Guard launched a helicopter crew, a small-boat crew, and Coast Guard Cutter Tern to search the area. Several local fire department crews are also assisting in the search efforts from Alameda County, Menlo Park, San Jose County and Santa Clara.

If anyone has seen Maldanado or has any additional information that may assist in the search efforts, please contact Coast Guard Sector San Francisco personnel at (415) 740-4364 or via radio at VHF-FM channel 16.

Coast Guard awards Meritorious Public Service Award

Tue, 01/24/2017 - 15:08

WASHINGTON – The Coast Guard presented its second-highest public service award to a leading maritime industry advocate in Paris, Monday.

Rear Adm. Paul Thomas, assistant commandant for prevention policy, recognized Aziz Bamik, general manager of GTT North America, for his support to the Coast Guard as a leading advocate for safe, clean and viable transport and use of liquefied gas within the maritime industry.

“As the liquefied gas industry grows we look to industry leadership to move this growth in the right direction,” Thomas said. “Aziz’ experience and cooperative nature have been pivotal in developing collaborative synergy throughout the liquefied gas community and has promoted a gold standard in design, operations and qualification for some of the most novel marine projects. His actions throughout this time period are more than deserving of one of the Coast Guard’s highest public service award.”

Bamik was appointed general manager of GTT North America in 2014 and has since campaigned for safe design and operations of novel U.S. maritime gas projects and worked directly with numerous Coast Guard offices. On many occasions, he trained countless Coast Guard personnel to better understand this new and dynamic cargo and fuel through internal Coast Guard webinars, presentations and technical seminars.

"I humbly accept this award on behalf of the GTT team who has been and remains a long standing partner of the Coast Guard's efforts to provide a foundation for safe maritime LNG operations," Bamik said. "With the growing number of LNG export facilities coming on stream and new applications such as LNG as fuel, GTT will continue to work closely with the Coast Guard to adapt the standards and provide technology and training support that are critical to this industry."

The Meritorious Public Service Award is one of the highest public service awards issued by the Coast Guard, given to recognize unusual courage in advancing a Coast Guard mission, substantial contribution to the Coast Guard that produced tangible results and specific individual accomplishments that provide unique benefits to the public.

For more information, please view the entire award citation.

For photos, please contact Lt. Katie Braynard at 202-372-4619.

Coast Guard awards Meritorious Public Service Award

Tue, 01/24/2017 - 12:22

WASHINGTON – The Coast Guard presented its second-highest public service award to a leading maritime industry advocate in Paris, Monday.

Rear Adm. Paul Thomas, assistant commandant for prevention policy, recognized Aziz Bamik, general manager of GTT North America, for his support to the Coast Guard as a leading advocate for safe, clean and viable transport and use of liquefied gas within the maritime industry.

“As the liquefied gas industry grows we look to industry leadership to move this growth in the right direction,” Thomas said. “Aziz’ experience and cooperative nature have been pivotal in developing collaborative synergy throughout the liquefied gas community and has promoted a gold standard in design, operations and qualification for some of the most novel marine projects. His actions throughout this time period are more than deserving of one of the Coast Guard’s highest public service award.”

Bamik was appointed general manager of GTT North America in 2014 and has since campaigned for safe design and operations of novel U.S. maritime gas projects and worked directly with numerous Coast Guard offices. On many occasions, he trained countless Coast Guard personnel to better understand this new and dynamic cargo and fuel through internal Coast Guard webinars, presentations and technical seminars.

"I humbly accept this award on behalf of the GTT team who has been and remains a long standing partner of the Coast Guard's efforts to provide a foundation for safe maritime LNG operations," Bamik said. "With the growing number of LNG export facilities coming on stream and new applications such as LNG as fuel, GTT will continue to work closely with the Coast Guard to adapt the standards and provide technology and training support that are critical to this industry."

The Meritorious Public Service Award is one of the highest public service awards issued by the Coast Guard, given to recognize unusual courage in advancing a Coast Guard mission, substantial contribution to the Coast Guard that produced tangible results and specific individual accomplishments that provide unique benefits to the public.

For more information, please view the entire award citation.

For photos, please contact Lt. Katie Braynard at 202-372-4619.

Coast Guard, Maui Fire Department searching for person in water offshore Maui

Tue, 01/24/2017 - 11:53

HONOLULU — The Coast Guard and Maui Fire Department are searching for a man swept out to sea near Kahului, Maui, Tuesday.

Missing is a 34-year-old Caucasian man last seen wearing dark shorts, no shirt with a shaved head.

Currently searching are an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew and HC-130 Hercules airplane crew, both from Air Station Barbers Point, the crew of USCGC AHI (WPB 87364) and ground crews from Coast Guard Station Maui.

Maui Fire Department is searching with a helicopter crew and additional ground crews are conducting shoreline searches. An incident command post has been established at Olivine Tide Pools.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu Command Center were notified at 9:15 p.m., Monday, of two people swept out to sea near the Olivine Tide Pools. One person was recovered and safely transported to Maui Memorial reportedly in stable condition.

The Coast Guard issued an Urgent Marine Information Broadcast requesting that mariners in the area keep a sharp look out and report any sighting to command center watchstanders at 808-842-2600.

On-scene weather conditions are reportedly winds 24 mph with waves at 9 feet.

Coast Guard, Maui Fire Department searching for person in water offshore Maui

Tue, 01/24/2017 - 11:53

HONOLULU — The Coast Guard and Maui Fire Department are searching for a man swept out to sea near Kahului, Maui, Tuesday.

Missing is a 34-year-old Caucasian man last seen wearing dark shorts, no shirt with a shaved head.

Currently searching are an MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew and HC-130 Hercules airplane crew, both from Air Station Barbers Point, the crew of USCGC AHI (WPB 87364) and ground crews from Coast Guard Station Maui.

Maui Fire Department is searching with a helicopter crew and additional ground crews are conducting shoreline searches. An incident command post has been established at Olivine Tide Pools.

Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Honolulu Command Center were notified at 9:15 p.m., Monday, of two people swept out to sea near the Olivine Tide Pools. One person was recovered and safely transported to Maui Memorial reportedly in stable condition.

The Coast Guard issued an Urgent Marine Information Broadcast requesting that mariners in the area keep a sharp look out and report any sighting to command center watchstanders at 808-842-2600.

On-scene weather conditions are reportedly winds 24 mph with waves at 9 feet.

Coast Guard counterdrug operations fact sheet

Tue, 01/24/2017 - 11:32

The Coast Guard measures annual narcotics removal according to the U.S. Government’s Fiscal Year (FY), which runs from Oct.1 to Sept. 30. The Coast Guard’s newest recording-breaking year was Fiscal Year 2016 (FY16), which ran from Oct. 1, 2015, to Sept. 30, 2016.

Coast Guard counterdrug operations in FY16 by the numbers:

  • Cocaine Removed in FY16 – more than 443,790 pounds (200,941 kilograms) (Coast Guard’s new record)
  • Cocaine Removed in FY08 – 367,700 (166,785 kilograms) (previous record)
  • Value of FY16 Cocaine Removals - $5.9 Billion wholesale
  • # of drug interdictions – 282
  • Number of suspects detained – 585 (new Coast Guard record up from 503 in FY15)
  • Suspects transferred to the U.S. for prosecution – 465 (up from 373 in FY15)
  • Smuggling vessels seized - 172
  • FY16 self-propelled semisubmersible (SPSS) interdictions – 6
  • Total Coast Guard SPSS interdictions – 43 (as of Oct. 12, 2016)
  • In FY16, National Security Cutters removed over 85,970 pounds of cocaine worth more than $1.1 billion
  • In FY16, medium endurance cutters removed nearly 177,600 pounds of cocaine worth more than $2.38 billion
  • Tactical law enforcement teams removed 79,300 pounds of cocaine worth more than $1 billion in FY16
  • In an average year, Coast Guard interdictions at sea amount to more than three times the quality of cocaine seized at U.S. borders and within the country combined.

Coast Guard urges caution during ice breaking operations near Port of Marinette on bay of Green Bay

Tue, 01/24/2017 - 09:48

MILWAUKEE – The Coast Guard is urging residents and people recreating on the bay of Green Bay to use caution during ice breaking operations scheduled for Thursday.

The Coast Guard Cutter Mobile Bay is scheduled to break ice and create a track from Rock Island Passage to the Menominee Entrance in support of the scheduled arrival of a vessel into the Port of Marinette.

Recreational users of the ice should plan their activities carefully, use caution near the ice and stay away from shipping channels and the Lake Carriers Association (LCA) track lines.

Ice is unpredictable and dangerous. Ice breaking activities taking place miles away from the shore can, and does, create instability along adjacent shorelines. In addition, recent warm temperatures may have weakened ice and created unstable conditions.

The Coast Guard always reminds people that varying levels of ice thickness are common on the Great Lakes and inland waterways. If you’re planning to go out on the Great Lakes or nearby bays in the winter, remember the acronym ICE, which stands for Information, Clothing, and Equipment.

Information: Get the right information on weather and ice conditions before going out. Water currents, particularly around narrow spots, bridges, inlets and outlets are always suspect for thin ice. Stay away from cracks, seams, pressure ridges, slushy areas and darker areas for these signify thinner ice.

Always tell family and friends where you are going and when you expect to be back – stick to the plan and notify them when plans have changed. Use the buddy system: NEVER go out on the ice alone. If you choose to go out on the ice alone, stay in an area where other people can see you.

Clothing: Ensure you wear the proper clothing to prevent hypothermia, the biggest danger after falling through the ice even if you manages to get out immediately, and choose bright colors to be more easily seen by others. It’s not uncommon for people to become disoriented while on the ice, especially in low visibility or deteriorating weather conditions.

Equipment: Never venture onto the ice without proper safety equipment: a marine radio, a Personal Locator Beacon, life jacket, a whistle or noise-making device, and screw drivers or ice picks which can be used to pull yourself back onto solid ice if you fall through.

Wear a Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device. When the human body is immersed in cold water, an involuntary reaction (gasp reflex or cold shock response) causes a person to take a deep breath, thus inhaling water. This begins the drowning process. A PFD allows a person to float with a minimum of energy expended, allows them to get breathing under control and allows the person to assume the heat escape lessening position (H.E.L.P.) – bringing the knees close to the chest and holding them in place by wrapping the arms around the shin portions of the legs.

The Coast Guard also reminds people to never drive on the ice. Owners of vehicles left on the ice after a rescue can be subject to civil penalties, if their vehicle causes a pollution discharge. This can happen when vehicles fall through ice that has either weakened from thawing or has shifted because of natural or manmade reasons. Such civil penalties can range from $250 to $11,000.

Further inquiries about this ice breaking operation can be made to Coast Guard Sector Sault Ste. Marie Vessel Traffic Service at 906-635-3232 or at sootfc@uscg.mil.    

Coast Guard urges caution during ice breaking operations near Port of Marinette on bay of Green Bay

Tue, 01/24/2017 - 09:48

MILWAUKEE – The Coast Guard is urging residents and people recreating on the bay of Green Bay to use caution during ice breaking operations scheduled for Thursday.

The Coast Guard Cutter Mobile Bay is scheduled to break ice and create a track from Rock Island Passage to the Menominee Entrance in support of the scheduled arrival of a vessel into the Port of Marinette.

Recreational users of the ice should plan their activities carefully, use caution near the ice and stay away from shipping channels and the Lake Carriers Association (LCA) track lines.

Ice is unpredictable and dangerous. Ice breaking activities taking place miles away from the shore can, and does, create instability along adjacent shorelines. In addition, recent warm temperatures may have weakened ice and created unstable conditions.

The Coast Guard always reminds people that varying levels of ice thickness are common on the Great Lakes and inland waterways. If you’re planning to go out on the Great Lakes or nearby bays in the winter, remember the acronym ICE, which stands for Information, Clothing, and Equipment.

Information: Get the right information on weather and ice conditions before going out. Water currents, particularly around narrow spots, bridges, inlets and outlets are always suspect for thin ice. Stay away from cracks, seams, pressure ridges, slushy areas and darker areas for these signify thinner ice.

Always tell family and friends where you are going and when you expect to be back – stick to the plan and notify them when plans have changed. Use the buddy system: NEVER go out on the ice alone. If you choose to go out on the ice alone, stay in an area where other people can see you.

Clothing: Ensure you wear the proper clothing to prevent hypothermia, the biggest danger after falling through the ice even if you manages to get out immediately, and choose bright colors to be more easily seen by others. It’s not uncommon for people to become disoriented while on the ice, especially in low visibility or deteriorating weather conditions.

Equipment: Never venture onto the ice without proper safety equipment: a marine radio, a Personal Locator Beacon, life jacket, a whistle or noise-making device, and screw drivers or ice picks which can be used to pull yourself back onto solid ice if you fall through.

Wear a Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device. When the human body is immersed in cold water, an involuntary reaction (gasp reflex or cold shock response) causes a person to take a deep breath, thus inhaling water. This begins the drowning process. A PFD allows a person to float with a minimum of energy expended, allows them to get breathing under control and allows the person to assume the heat escape lessening position (H.E.L.P.) – bringing the knees close to the chest and holding them in place by wrapping the arms around the shin portions of the legs.

The Coast Guard also reminds people to never drive on the ice. Owners of vehicles left on the ice after a rescue can be subject to civil penalties, if their vehicle causes a pollution discharge. This can happen when vehicles fall through ice that has either weakened from thawing or has shifted because of natural or manmade reasons. Such civil penalties can range from $250 to $11,000.

Further inquiries about this ice breaking operation can be made to Coast Guard Sector Sault Ste. Marie Vessel Traffic Service at 906-635-3232 or at sootfc@uscg.mil.    

Imagery Release: Coast Guard rescues pilot near Shelikof Strait, Alaska

Tue, 01/24/2017 - 03:33
Editor's Note: To view or download imagery, please click on the images below. Downloading from DVIDS requires free registration.

Coast Guard, local first responders recover two people who fell through ice on Sandy Pond in Oswego

Mon, 01/23/2017 - 14:53

CLEVELAND — The bodies of two men who fell through the ice while ice fishing on Sandy Pond in Oswego, Monday, were recovered following a search by the Coast Guard and first responders from partnering agencies.

Shortly after 11 a.m., a watchstander at Coast Guard Station Oswego received a call from 911 dispatch stating that a good Samaritan reported seeing individuals in the water about one-quarter mile offshore in Sandy Pond.

An ice rescue team from Station Oswego responded. Rescue personnel from Sandy Creek Fire Department, the State Police, Oswego County Sheriff’s Department, and local EMS also responded.

When rescuers arrived on scene, one of the fishermen had already gone under water, while the other man was clinging to the edge of the ice. During the attempt to reach the man, he slipped under water and did not resurface.

After searching more than four hours, members of the Sandy Creek Fire Department Dive Team recovered the two fishermen near the area where they fell through the ice.  

Earlier in the search, the Coast Guard requested assistance from the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre in Ontario, Canada. Rescue crews aboard a Griffin helicopter and a C-130 plane assisted in the search. The Coast Guard also launched a rescue crew aboard a Dolphin helicopter from Air Station Detroit. However, they were instructed to return to base after the two fishermen were recovered.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of the two fisherman,”  stated Capt. Joseph Dufresne, Coast Guard Sector Buffalo command officer. “I commend the efforts of all who were involved in the rescue efforts.”

The Coast Guard is reminding those who recreate outdoors to be aware of weakening ice as a result of recent warm temperatures. Ice is unpredictable and can be extremely dangerous.  

Those who recreate on ice should remember the acronym ICE, which stands for Information, Clothing, and Equipment. Get the right information on weather and ice conditions before going out; know where you’re going, how to get there, and how to call for help. Ensure you wear the proper clothing to prevent hypothermia and choose bright colors to be more easily seen by others.

The Coast Guard also recommends to:

  • always check the weather and ice conditions before any trip out onto the ice. Ice thickness is not consistent. Water currents, particularly around narrow spots, bridges, inlets and outlets are always suspect for thin ice. Stay away from cracks, seams, pressure ridges, slushy areas and darker areas for these signify thinner ice.
  • avoid standing if you suspect the ice may be weak or unstable.
  • wear a Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device. The chances of being rescued and surviving after falling through the ice are significantly higher if wearing a personal floatation device. When the human body is immersed in cold water, an involuntary reaction (gasp reflex or cold shock response) causes a person to take a deep breath, thus inhaling water which begins the drowning process.  A PFD allows a person to float with a minimum of energy expended, allows them to get breathing under control and allows the person to assume the heat escape lessening position (H.E.L.P.) – bringing the knees close to the chest and holding them in place by wrapping the arms around the shin portions of the legs.
  • carry two ice picks or screwdrivers. If one falls through the ice, these instruments can aid in pulling one’s self back onto solid ice. They are much more effective than hands alone, since there’s nothing to grip.
  • carry a whistle or noise-making device to alert people of distress; carry a VHF-FM radio or Personal Locator Beacon, to contact local emergency responders.

Hypothermia is the biggest danger after falling through the ice, even if one manages to get out immediately. Hypothermia sets in quickly as the human body’s core temperature drops below 95 degrees.

 

 

 

Coast Guard, local first responders recover two people who fell through ice on Sandy Pond in Oswego

Mon, 01/23/2017 - 14:53

CLEVELAND — The bodies of two men who fell through the ice while ice fishing on Sandy Pond in Oswego, Monday, were recovered following a search by the Coast Guard and first responders from partnering agencies.

Shortly after 11 a.m., a watchstander at Coast Guard Station Oswego received a call from 911 dispatch stating that a good Samaritan reported seeing individuals in the water about one-quarter mile offshore in Sandy Pond.

An ice rescue team from Station Oswego responded. Rescue personnel from Sandy Creek Fire Department, the State Police, Oswego County Sheriff’s Department, and local EMS also responded.

When rescuers arrived on scene, one of the fishermen had already gone under water, while the other man was clinging to the edge of the ice. During the attempt to reach the man, he slipped under water and did not resurface.

After searching more than four hours, members of the Sandy Creek Fire Department Dive Team recovered the two fishermen near the area where they fell through the ice.  

Earlier in the search, the Coast Guard requested assistance from the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre in Ontario, Canada. Rescue crews aboard a Griffin helicopter and a C-130 plane assisted in the search. The Coast Guard also launched a rescue crew aboard a Dolphin helicopter from Air Station Detroit. However, they were instructed to return to base after the two fishermen were recovered.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of the two fisherman,”  stated Capt. Joseph Dufresne, Coast Guard Sector Buffalo command officer. “I commend the efforts of all who were involved in the rescue efforts.”

The Coast Guard is reminding those who recreate outdoors to be aware of weakening ice as a result of recent warm temperatures. Ice is unpredictable and can be extremely dangerous.  

Those who recreate on ice should remember the acronym ICE, which stands for Information, Clothing, and Equipment. Get the right information on weather and ice conditions before going out; know where you’re going, how to get there, and how to call for help. Ensure you wear the proper clothing to prevent hypothermia and choose bright colors to be more easily seen by others.

The Coast Guard also recommends to:

  • always check the weather and ice conditions before any trip out onto the ice. Ice thickness is not consistent. Water currents, particularly around narrow spots, bridges, inlets and outlets are always suspect for thin ice. Stay away from cracks, seams, pressure ridges, slushy areas and darker areas for these signify thinner ice.
  • avoid standing if you suspect the ice may be weak or unstable.
  • wear a Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device. The chances of being rescued and surviving after falling through the ice are significantly higher if wearing a personal floatation device. When the human body is immersed in cold water, an involuntary reaction (gasp reflex or cold shock response) causes a person to take a deep breath, thus inhaling water which begins the drowning process.  A PFD allows a person to float with a minimum of energy expended, allows them to get breathing under control and allows the person to assume the heat escape lessening position (H.E.L.P.) – bringing the knees close to the chest and holding them in place by wrapping the arms around the shin portions of the legs.
  • carry two ice picks or screwdrivers. If one falls through the ice, these instruments can aid in pulling one’s self back onto solid ice. They are much more effective than hands alone, since there’s nothing to grip.
  • carry a whistle or noise-making device to alert people of distress; carry a VHF-FM radio or Personal Locator Beacon, to contact local emergency responders.

Hypothermia is the biggest danger after falling through the ice, even if one manages to get out immediately. Hypothermia sets in quickly as the human body’s core temperature drops below 95 degrees.

 

 

 

Coast Guard, local first responders recover two people who fell through ice on Sandy Pond in Oswego

Mon, 01/23/2017 - 14:53

CLEVELAND — The bodies of two men who fell through the ice while ice fishing on Sandy Pond in Oswego, Monday, were recovered following a search by the Coast Guard and first responders from partnering agencies.

Shortly after 11 a.m., a watchstander at Coast Guard Station Oswego received a call from 911 dispatch stating that a good Samaritan reported seeing individuals in the water about one-quarter mile offshore in Sandy Pond.

An ice rescue team from Station Oswego responded. Rescue personnel from Sandy Creek Fire Department, the State Police, Oswego County Sheriff’s Department, and local EMS also responded.

When rescuers arrived on scene, one of the fishermen had already gone under water, while the other man was clinging to the edge of the ice. During the attempt to reach the man, he slipped under water and did not resurface.

After searching more than four hours, members of the Sandy Creek Fire Department Dive Team recovered the two fishermen near the area where they fell through the ice.  

Earlier in the search, the Coast Guard requested assistance from the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre in Ontario, Canada. Rescue crews aboard a Griffin helicopter and a C-130 plane assisted in the search. The Coast Guard also launched a rescue crew aboard a Dolphin helicopter from Air Station Detroit. However, they were instructed to return to base after the two fishermen were recovered.

“Our thoughts and prayers are with the family and friends of the two fisherman,”  stated Capt. Joseph Dufresne, Coast Guard Sector Buffalo command officer. “I commend the efforts of all who were involved in the rescue efforts.”

The Coast Guard is reminding those who recreate outdoors to be aware of weakening ice as a result of recent warm temperatures. Ice is unpredictable and can be extremely dangerous.  

Those who recreate on ice should remember the acronym ICE, which stands for Information, Clothing, and Equipment. Get the right information on weather and ice conditions before going out; know where you’re going, how to get there, and how to call for help. Ensure you wear the proper clothing to prevent hypothermia and choose bright colors to be more easily seen by others.

The Coast Guard also recommends to:

  • always check the weather and ice conditions before any trip out onto the ice. Ice thickness is not consistent. Water currents, particularly around narrow spots, bridges, inlets and outlets are always suspect for thin ice. Stay away from cracks, seams, pressure ridges, slushy areas and darker areas for these signify thinner ice.
  • avoid standing if you suspect the ice may be weak or unstable.
  • wear a Coast Guard-approved personal flotation device. The chances of being rescued and surviving after falling through the ice are significantly higher if wearing a personal floatation device. When the human body is immersed in cold water, an involuntary reaction (gasp reflex or cold shock response) causes a person to take a deep breath, thus inhaling water which begins the drowning process.  A PFD allows a person to float with a minimum of energy expended, allows them to get breathing under control and allows the person to assume the heat escape lessening position (H.E.L.P.) – bringing the knees close to the chest and holding them in place by wrapping the arms around the shin portions of the legs.
  • carry two ice picks or screwdrivers. If one falls through the ice, these instruments can aid in pulling one’s self back onto solid ice. They are much more effective than hands alone, since there’s nothing to grip.
  • carry a whistle or noise-making device to alert people of distress; carry a VHF-FM radio or Personal Locator Beacon, to contact local emergency responders.

Hypothermia is the biggest danger after falling through the ice, even if one manages to get out immediately. Hypothermia sets in quickly as the human body’s core temperature drops below 95 degrees.

 

 

 

Coast Guard establishes Merrimack River safety zone, issues additional maritime warnings ahead of heavy weather

Mon, 01/23/2017 - 14:26

BOSTON – The Coast Guard has established a temporary safety zone at the Merrimack River entrance beginning Monday at 10 p.m. until Wednesday at 10 a.m. to reduce significant hazards to the vessels, the harbor, and the public as current weather predictions are calling for sea states to increase significantly during this storm.

No vessels or person will be permitted to operate within the safety zone without obtaining permission from the Coast Guard Sector Boston Captain of the Port or designated representative.

General boating public will be notified of the temporary safety zone via Broadcast Notice to Mariners.

Coast Guard Station Merrimack River in Newburyport will notify the boating public of dangerous conditions and safety zone at the Merrimack River bar by issuing Broadcast Notice to Mariners (BNM) on VHF–FM Channel 16 and 22A.

The maritime community and the public should also be advised that Coast Guard Station Merrimack River’s 47-foot motor lifeboats have been relocated to Cape Ann. This will cause a delayed response in excess of one hour possibly longer as weather conditions deteriorate.

The public is advised to stay off the jetties and beaches, as these swells are extremely dangerous and can sweep people out off before they can react. 

The Merrimack River Bar can be unpredictable. Please remain vigilant. For more lifesaving practices visit www.uscgboating.org.  You can also speak directly with the station by calling 978-465-0731.

Coast Guard establishes Merrimack River safety zone, issues additional maritime warnings ahead of heavy weather

Mon, 01/23/2017 - 14:26

BOSTON – The Coast Guard has established a temporary safety zone at the Merrimack River entrance beginning Monday at 10 p.m. until Wednesday at 10 a.m. to reduce significant hazards to the vessels, the harbor, and the public as current weather predictions are calling for sea states to increase significantly during this storm.

No vessels or person will be permitted to operate within the safety zone without obtaining permission from the Coast Guard Sector Boston Captain of the Port or designated representative.

General boating public will be notified of the temporary safety zone via Broadcast Notice to Mariners.

Coast Guard Station Merrimack River in Newburyport will notify the boating public of dangerous conditions and safety zone at the Merrimack River bar by issuing Broadcast Notice to Mariners (BNM) on VHF–FM Channel 16 and 22A.

The maritime community and the public should also be advised that Coast Guard Station Merrimack River’s 47-foot motor lifeboats have been relocated to Cape Ann. This will cause a delayed response in excess of one hour possibly longer as weather conditions deteriorate.

The public is advised to stay off the jetties and beaches, as these swells are extremely dangerous and can sweep people out off before they can react. 

The Merrimack River Bar can be unpredictable. Please remain vigilant. For more lifesaving practices visit www.uscgboating.org.  You can also speak directly with the station by calling 978-465-0731.

Coast Guard establishes Merrimack River safety zone, issues additional maritime warnings ahead of heavy weather

Mon, 01/23/2017 - 14:26

BOSTON – The Coast Guard has established a temporary safety zone at the Merrimack River entrance beginning Monday at 10 p.m. until Wednesday at 10 a.m. to reduce significant hazards to the vessels, the harbor, and the public as current weather predictions are calling for sea states to increase significantly during this storm.

No vessels or person will be permitted to operate within the safety zone without obtaining permission from the Coast Guard Sector Boston Captain of the Port or designated representative.

General boating public will be notified of the temporary safety zone via Broadcast Notice to Mariners.

Coast Guard Station Merrimack River in Newburyport will notify the boating public of dangerous conditions and safety zone at the Merrimack River bar by issuing Broadcast Notice to Mariners (BNM) on VHF–FM Channel 16 and 22A.

The maritime community and the public should also be advised that Coast Guard Station Merrimack River’s 47-foot motor lifeboats have been relocated to Cape Ann. This will cause a delayed response in excess of one hour possibly longer as weather conditions deteriorate.

The public is advised to stay off the jetties and beaches, as these swells are extremely dangerous and can sweep people out off before they can react. 

The Merrimack River Bar can be unpredictable. Please remain vigilant. For more lifesaving practices visit www.uscgboating.org.  You can also speak directly with the station by calling 978-465-0731.

Imagery Release: Coast Guard rescues pilot near Shelikof Strait, Alaska

Mon, 01/23/2017 - 11:33
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**Multimedia** Coast Guard medevacs man 145 miles southwest of Key West

Sun, 01/22/2017 - 19:42

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MIAMI — The Coast Guard medevacked a 34-year-old man Sunday from the tanker Huemel 145 miles southwest of Key West.

At 2:45 p.m. Sunday, Coast Guard Sector Key West received a report from a crewman aboard the tanker Huemel who stated a crew member fell and suffered head and shoulder injuries. A Coast Guard Air Station Miami MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew hoisted the man, transported him to Air Station Miami and transferred him to awaiting EMS personnel.

For breaking news follow us on Twitter @USCGSoutheast.

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